Be Healthy

15 Simple Ways to Open Your Heart

Awakening People websites’ Sabrina Reber wrote an article called “15 Simple Ways to Open Your Heart.”
 
With the Christmas season here and New Year’s Resolutions right around the corner, I thought we could all get something out of this article.
 
https://www.awakeningpeople.com/15-simple-ways-to-open-your-heart.html

10 Ways to Stay Healthy During the Holiday Season

Health.com’s Norine Dworkin-McDaniel wrote a very interesting article about “10 Ways to Stay Healthy During the Holidays” – Whether you’re at the mall, a party, or on a train or plane, you can stop yourself from getting sick and out of shape. Learn the easy ways to stay well all season long.
 
– Beat germs, stay well
– Wipe away germs
– Stay hydrated
– Cruise the aisle
– Watch your hands
– Stop for a rubdown
– Say no to treats
– Snack wisely
– Stay in, rest up
– Prevent overeating
– Have a drink (but not too many!)
 
We’ve all survived Thanksgiving this year….how well did you do with the tips above?
 
Enjoy the FULL Health.com article, by clicking here.
 
 
Source: Health.com. Norine Dworkin-McDaniel. https://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20648861,00.html

The 30 Best Things About Being A Woman

Cosmopolitan Magazines’ Anna Breslaw wrote “The 30 Best Things About Being A Woman” – I’ve got to say that we rock! The article did leave out one small “Best Thing” about being a woman….that’s owning a Bra Tree® !

Check out the list and let us know the thing that YOU love the most about being a woman!
Source: https://www.cosmopolitan.com/sex-love/advice/a5649/best-things-about-being-a-woman/

1. We’re better listeners. Which is why we can talk to our friends on the phone for hours about everything from foreign policy to Rihanna, and guys don’t really talk to each other about jack shit.

2. We can multi-task. Hello, texting, putting makeup on and looking up directions and being happy, free, confused and lonely at the same time.

3. We are better at parking. Yeahh, that whole “women are bad drivers because Tampon Brain” stereotype? Mythbusted. Even insurance companies know it. Sorry, unoriginal stand-up comedians.

4. And we’re more likely to negotiate a good deal on car repairs.

5. We also save money on everything else. Oh, the power of flirting.

6. Unlike their male counterparts, female leaders check their egos at the door. As U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer said, “Women do have a more inclusive way of leading. We try to bring more people along with us.”

7. Our sex lives stay hot well into our suburbs-and-SUV years. We’re all Mrs. Robinson.

8. And our sexuality is more fluid. Particularly as we age. A Boise University study found that 60 percent of heterosexual women have been sexually attracted to other women, which allows us a much greater chance at finding a partner who won’t annoy the shit out of us, thank you very much.

9. We’re better at giving gifts. Because we are tasteful and thoughtful and know when a necklace is hideous even if it’s expensive.

10. Women who drink a glass of wine a week make healthier life choices overall. Amazing.

11. We’re better at expressing ourselves via text. Seriously, give any random woman on the street an iPhone and tell her to text her BFF, and she basically becomes Arthur Miller.

12. We make better doctors. No matter what the constant catfighting on Grey’s Anatomy might suggest to you, female doctors are basically Cristina Yang sans emotional dysfunction.

13. We’re more emotionally intelligent. In other words, we’ve never tried to have sex with someone who was crying, unlike a certain gender.

14. We care more about the environment. Women are far more likely to recycle on the regs than men are.

15. Women with big butts are smarter and healthier. Holla.

16. Girls do better in school.

17. And women do better in college.

18. We don’t have to feel weird in yoga. I see you, one guy in all-female class who may or may not be there to look up girls’ buttholes. Stop it.

19. We handle job interview stress more gracefully. With one glass of wine! Just kidding. Kinda.

20. We’re attracted to funny guys without being threatened. Get over yourselves, men.

21. We manage debt better. You + Sallie Mae = BFF. (Okay, maybe not, but still, you’re better off.)

22. Michelle Obama is a woman. Which is pretty much like having Vin Diesel on our dodgeball team.

23. We have a much wider and more diverse range of shoe options. If my only two choices were Converse, flip-flips, and dress shoes, I would die of boredom.

24. We can change our hair and look completely different whenever we want. And we don’t look like seven-year-olds right after a haircut.

25. Our bodies are nicer. I mean, penises are functional, but they’re no prize visually.

26. We don’t look like a bag of fruit when we work out in Spandex.

27. We can enjoy wonderful things like interpretive dance and baby animals and Beyoncé without judgment.

28. We’re better Army helicopter pilots.

29. We can improve our appearance via makeup. Which is totally subjective, and could mean anything from “We can even out our skin tone” to “We can wear crazy blue lipstick and look like a badass” if we want to.

30. We have the ability to create life. You know, NBD.

9 Foods to Eat for Better Breast Health

With Thanksgiving looming – (next week as I’m typing this) – I’m sure I’ve shared this post before, but I just want to make sure that we care for our breasts as much as everything and everyone else this holiday season. Some of the “9 Foods” aren’t too “Thanksgiving-ish” but some I’m sure we can sneak in.
 
This article is from Eating Well, by Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D., September 26, 2011
https://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/health_blog/9_foods_to_eat_for_better_breast_health
 
Very recently someone near and dear to me had a breast cancer scare [the author of the article]. My entire family rejoiced when her biopsy results came back benign—but had she not been so fortunate this would have been her second battle with breast cancer.
 
As the buzz of the good news subsided I began to think of my own breast health. I’m still a ways off from the age when the majority of breast cancer cases occur (50+)—and there are factors that up my risk of breast cancer that I can’t control, like family history, getting older and (ahem!) being a woman—but there are lifestyle changes I can make now to tip the odds in my favor in the years ahead.
 
Staying lean and moving more are at the top of my list, because one of the most important ways to reduce breast cancer risk is to avoid gaining weight, according to a review article in the journal Cancer. And other research has found that regular, strenuous exercise may help lower risk too. (Start losing weight today with this 28-Day Diet Meal Plan to Lose 8 Pounds This Month.)
 
But what I eat plays a role, too, as Holly Pevzner reported when she interviewed Cheryl L. Rock, Ph.D., R.D., professor of family and preventive medicine at the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, for the current issue of EatingWell Magazine: “A woman can cut her chance of cancer by as much as two-thirds with good nutrition and weight management,” says Rock. “Even a woman who carries the BRCA1 or 2 gene [two genetic mutations that up a woman’s risk] can reduce her risk.”
 
I’ll be adding these foods to my grocery cart:
 
Plums & Peaches.
Researchers at Texas A&M recently found that plums and peaches have antioxidant levels to rival “superfood” blueberries—and that they contain two types of polyphenols (antioxidants) that may help kill breast cancer cells while leaving healthy cells intact. This is good news, as 180,000 new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed each year and traditional treatments often harm healthy cells.
 
Walnuts. Recent research in the journal Nutrition and Cancer suggests walnuts may thwart the growth of breast cancer. In a study out of Marshall University School of Medicine in West Virginia, researchers substituted the equivalent of two ounces of walnuts per day into the diet of one group of mice; the other group was fed a calorically equivalent, but walnut-free, diet. After 34 days, the growth rate of tumors in the walnut eaters was half that of the mice who ate no walnuts. Experts think walnuts’ anti-inflammatory properties—which could come from the omega-3 fat alpha-linolenic acid, phytosterols or antioxidants—may give them their tumor-fighting potential. One caveat: the study dose of two ounces supplies 370 calories. Still, “walnuts can be part of a healthy diet that can reduce your risk for cancer,” says lead researcher Elaine Hardman, Ph.D.
 
Broccoli. Sulforaphane—a compound in broccoli—reduced the number of breast cancer stem cells (which cause cancer spread and recurrence) in mice, according to research from the University of Michigan. Eating broccoli may not deliver enough sulforaphane to achieve the same effect, but to get the most you can, eat your broccoli raw or briefly steam or stir-fry the green florets. (Boiling destroys some of the sulforaphane.)
 
Salmon. Taking fish-oil supplements for at least 10 years can shrink your risk of ductal carcinoma, the most common type of breast cancer, according to a study in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. It’s thought that the omega-3 fats in fish oil reduce inflammation, which may contribute to breast cancer. But you can skip the supplement aisle, say the study’s researchers, and eat about 8 ounces of oily fish (salmon, sardines, tuna) a week.
 
Olive Oil. Another reason to reach for extra-virgin olive oil: when researchers in Barcelona gave rats with breast cancer a diet in which fat came predominantly from extra-virgin olive oil (versus corn oil), they found that the olive oil’s antioxidants and oleic acid (a mono-unsaturated fat) quelled growth of malignant cells. (Find out where olive oil ranks among the 2 best oils for cooking and 2 worst oils.)
 
Parsley. University of Missouri scientists found that this herb can actually inhibit cancer-cell growth. Animals that were given apigenin, a compound abundant in parsley (and in celery), boosted their resistance to developing cancerous tumors. Experts recommend adding a couple pinches of minced fresh parsley to your dishes daily.
 
Coffee. Drinking about two 12-ounce coffees a day may lower your risk of an aggressive form of breast cancer, says a May 2011 study in Breast Cancer Research. “One possibility is that coffee’s antioxidants protect cells from damage that can lead to cancer,” says study author Jingmei Li, Ph.D. More research is needed, so don’t up your intake based on these findings just yet. (If you already are a coffee drinker, here are 4 reasons to not quit your coffee “habit,” and 4 cons to consider.)
 
Beans. According to a new report, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, upping your fiber intake may help lower your risk of breast cancer—and the more you eat, the more your risk decreases. The researchers found that for every 10 grams of fiber a woman added to her daily diet, her risk of breast cancer decreased by 7 percent. That’s about a 1/2 to one cup of beans, depending on the variety. Other foods packed with fiber include barley, bulgur, lentils, peas, artichokes, dates and raspberries.
 

How to Have Healthy Breasts for Life

Enjoy this WebMD article written by Amanda MacMillan and reviewed by Dr. Lisa Bernstein, MD on June 21, 2016
 
As women we need to love and respect our breasts; this article is an interesting read including topics such as What’s Normal, What’s Not, Know Your Risk for Breast Cancer, Changes When You’re Pregnant or Breastfeeding, Breast Health in Your 40’s and Up and Healthy Habits at Any Age.
 
https://www.webmd.com/women/guide/a-lifetime-of-healthy-breasts#1
 


Give your bosom buddies some love!